A Timeline of Major Irish Literary Works
Resources / 27/08/2019

Histories are told through stories. Irish literary history is measured in major works and writings, but these texts can also illuminate a great many pivotal events in the country’s history.  Irish Literature in the 12th century The Book of Leinster – 1150 AD (The Lebor Gabala Erren), Aislinge Mac Conglinne  Irish Literature in the 14th century The Yellow Book of Lecan, The Great Book of Lecan, The Book of Hy Many, and The Book of Ballymote  Irish Literature in the 17th century The Mourning Bride (1697) – William Congreve, Léig Dhíot Th’arm, a mhacaoimh mná – Phiarais Feirtéir, A Fhir Chumainn – Feargal óg Mac a Bhaird, Foras Feasa ar Éirinn – Seathrún Céitín, Truagh t’Fhágbháil, A Inis Chuinn, – Brian Mac Giolla Phádraig, Ware’s Tracts on Popery – James Ware, Is mairg nár chrean le maitheas saoghalts – Dáibhí O’Bruadair  Irish Literature in the 18th century The Deserted Village (1770) – Oliver Goldsmith, Gullivers Travels – Jonathan Swift, The School for Scandal (1776) – Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Brief Discourse – Aodh Buidhe MacCruitín, Wind and Weather, a Sermon (1797) – James Porter, A Letter to the Right Honorable William Pitt (1799) – William Drennan, Poems on Various Subjects (1804) – James Orr, To a Lady- Mary Barber, Tristram Shandy (1760) – Laurence Sterne, Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) – Edmund Burke, The Shaugraun (1875) -Dion Boucicault  Irish Literature in the Great Irish Famine: 1845-1850 John Keegan, Anthologia Germanica (1845) – James Clarence Mangan, Alexander the Great (1874) – Aubrey Thomas de Vere, Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (1830) – William…

Notable Periods in the History of Irish Literature
Resources / 13/08/2019

Irish Literature in the 12th century During the 12th century, Ireland was divided into a fluid hierarchy of petty kingdoms and over-kingdoms. Power was concentrated in the hands of regional dynasties fighting against each other for the control or more land. One of their number, the King of Leinster Diarmait Mac Murchada (anglicized as Diarmuid MacMorrough) was forcibly exiled from his kingdom by the new High King, Ruaidri mac Tairrdelbach Ua Conchobair. Fleeing to Aquitaine, Diarmait obtained permission from Henry II to use the Norman forces to regain his kingdom. The first Norman knight landed in Ireland in 1167, followed by the main forces of Normans, Welsh and Flemings in Wexford in 1169. Within a short time, Leinster was regained, Waterford and Dublin were under Diarmait’s control, and he had Strongbow as a son-in-law, later naming him as heir to the kingdom. This caused consternation to King Henry II of England, who feared the establishment of a rival Norman state in Ireland. He resolved to establish his authority.   Irish Literature in the 14th century The Yellow Book of Lecan, The Great Book of Lecan, The Book of Hy Many, and The Book of Ballymote. It is this manuscript of Irish sagas, law texts, and genealogies, that contains a guide to the ogham alphabet. Much of the information available on ogham has come from this manuscript and…